Safeguarding Adults:

Worried About An Adult?

Who is an adult at risk?

An adult at risk is someone who:

  • Is aged 18 or over
  • Has needs for care and support
  • May lack mental capacity to ask for care and support themselves
  • Is unable to protect themselves from either the risk of, or experiencing abuse or neglect

Examples of an 'adult at risk'

An adult at risk would include those who are unable to protect themselves as a result of their care and support needs, for example:

  • Someone who has a learning disability
  • Someone who has a physical disability and/or a sensory impairment
  • Has mental health needs and may require assistance to make particular decisions 
  • Has a long term illness / condition
  • An older person who is frail due to physical disability, cognitive impairment or ill health
  • Misuses substances / alcohol

Where could abuse happen?

Abuse can happen anywhere, for example

  • Your own home or someone else’s home
  • Day centre
  • In resdiential / care homes
  • Hospital
  • Work
  • College
  • Public places

Who might be an abuser?

  • partner, relative or family member
  • volunteer
  • staff member
  • neighbour
  • carer
  • friend 
  • stranger

Types of abuse

  • Physical or domestic abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Psychological abuse
  • Financial or material abuse
  • Modern slavery
  • Discriminatory abuse
  • Organisational abuse
  • Neglect and acts of omission
  • Self-neglect

How do I share concerns about an adult at risk?

If you believe an adult is at risk of neglect or abuse please contact:

Adult Social Care Team: 01253 477592 or 
Emergency out of hours Team: 01253 477600.

If they are in immediate danger, please contact the Police: 999.

What happens next?

They will look into your concern and where necessary work with the adult at risk and other agencies.

They will agree a plan with them in a way they want, that helps keep them safe.

Advocacy

People who lack capacity or who have difficulty in understanding or participating in the safeguarding process have the right to an advocate to help them voice their opinions and represent them. This can be a suitable family member or friend or - if there is no one who is available an independent advocate can be contracted by the Local Authority to help and support them.

Physical abuse

Domestic abuse

Sexual abuse

Psychological abuse

Financial or material abuse

Modern slavery

Discriminatory abuse

Organisational abuse

Neglect and acts of omission

Self-neglect